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Stitching the West Back TogetherConservation of Working Landscapes$
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Susan Charnley, Thomas E. Sheridan, and Gary P. Nabhan

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226165684

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226165851.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

Payments for Ecosystem Services

Payments for Ecosystem Services

Keeping Working Landscapes productive and functioning

Chapter:
(p.275) 14 Payments for Ecosystem Services
Source:
Stitching the West Back Together
Author(s):

Gary P. Nabhan

Laura López-Hoffman

Hannah Gosnell

Josh Goldstein

Richard Knight

Carrie Presnall

Lauren Gwin

Dawn Thilmany

Susan Charnley

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226165851.003.0023

An emerging approach for restoring natural ecosystems is payment for ecosystem services (PES). Two primary means for compensation are embedding the costs of maintaining the services in the price of food and fiber products, and offering financial incentives and rewards to ranchers, farmers, or foresters working to protect, enhance, or restore ecosystem services. Land managers can “bundle” multiple services that occur in a given location to leverage financial support or zoning recommendations. The public has benefitted from PES through such improvements as higher drinking water quality and protected open space. Businesses may fund conservation activities that protect their source materials or promote how their product is produced sustainably. Obstacles to PES are that they can seldom be justified on public lands, and the attempts of one landowner will have less impact than a regional effort. Landscape-scale PES could work if stakeholders share in both the practices and the payments.

Keywords:   payments for ecosystem services, restore ecosystems, protected open space, conservation activities, source materials

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