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Communities of StylePortable Luxury Arts, Identity, and Collective Memory in the Iron Age Levant$
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Marian H. Feldman

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226105611

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226164427.001.0001

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The Reuse, Recycling, and Displacement of Levantine Luxury Arts

The Reuse, Recycling, and Displacement of Levantine Luxury Arts

Chapter:
(p.139) Chapter 5 The Reuse, Recycling, and Displacement of Levantine Luxury Arts
Source:
Communities of Style
Author(s):

Marian H. Feldman

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226164427.003.0006

The chapter explores different ways in which communities could form around displaced artworks through several case studies of Levantine artworks that followed complicated biographical trajectories: bronzes found in Greece at pan-Hellenic sanctuaries (reworked bands at Olympia and horse harness elements at Samos and Eretria), ivories from within official palatial contexts (at Arslan Tash) and from outside (in the Town Wall Houses at Nimrud and at Til Barsip), and refashioned ivories and bronzes from a “royal” tomb at Salamis on Cyprus. The chapter also highlights the different ways in which these objects were used, and in some cases refashioned, for varying purposes of community formation by multiple cultural groups. These stories of access to and (re)use of portable luxury goods speak to their ongoing efficacy in social life. Such luxury portable objects could be acquired through official, state-sponsored collection and redistribution of booty and tribute. Yet non-state sponsored activities like looting, scavenging, and salvaging also allowed for the dissemination of prestigious elite materials into alternative channels of circulation. The case studies presented here illustrate the diversity and complexity of interactions in the Iron Age Near East and Mediterranean.

Keywords:   Olympia, Samos, Eretria, Town Wall Houses, Nimrud, Til Barsip, Arslan Tash, Salamis, object reuse, object recycling

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