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The Problem of Genesis in Husserl's Philosophy$
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Jacques Derrida

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780226143156

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226143774.001.0001

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Birth and Becoming of Judgment

Birth and Becoming of Judgment

Chapter:
(p.103) 6 Birth and Becoming of Judgment
Source:
The Problem of Genesis in Husserl's Philosophy
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226143774.003.0007

This chapter gives a description of the idea of “theme” on which Husserl insists more and more after Ideas I that deals with the intention of phenomenology—the unveiling or the elucidation of meanings adds nothing to a construction; these meanings no more create or invent than they devalue or destroy what preceded them. Husserl comes up to the problem of the originary evidence of the existent as such in Experience and Judgment, which is presented as a “genealogy of logic.” He presents the antepredicative world no longer as indefinite and a formal possibility, but as the always present actuality of the given. The only way for Husserl to escape from all the dilemmas that he has constantly put off was to comprehend them in their foundation and for this he clarified the transcendental temporality whose thematization he always announced.

Keywords:   theme, Husserl, genealogy of logic, Experience and Judgment, thematization, Ideas I

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