Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
After They Closed the GatesJewish Illegal Immigration to the United States, 1921-1965$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Libby Garland

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226122458

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226122595.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 21 October 2019

Battling Alien Registration

Battling Alien Registration

Chapter:
(p.148) Chapter 5 Battling Alien Registration
Source:
After They Closed the Gates
Author(s):

Libby Garland

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226122595.003.0006

Chapter Five explores the issue of internal “border control” in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s. It investigates the battles over alien registration laws requiring all non-naturalized foreigners to register with the government. American Jews consistently opposed these laws and led the fight against their passage and implementation. This chapter, which focuses in particular on the fate of a state alien registration law passed in Michigan in 1931, argues that Jews ultimately escaped the specter of illegal alienness in part through their own political efforts in the face of such controversies.

Keywords:   alien registration, Communists, Detroit, illegal immigration, internal border control, Jewish immigration, Jews, Michigan, quota laws

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.