Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Measuring Economic Sustainability and Progress$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Dale W. Jorgenson, J. Steven Landefeld, and Paul Schreyer

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226121338

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226121475.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 01 August 2021

Analysis of Wealth Using Micro- and Macrodata

Analysis of Wealth Using Micro- and Macrodata

A Comparison of the Survey of Consumer Finances and Flow of Funds Accounts

Chapter:
(p.245) 9 Analysis of Wealth Using Micro- and Macrodata
Source:
Measuring Economic Sustainability and Progress
Author(s):

Alice M. Henriques

Joanne W. Hsu

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226121475.003.0010

Researchers use different types of household balance sheet data to study different aspects of lifecycle saving and wealth accumulation behavior. Macro data from the Flow of Funds Accounts (FFA) are produced at a quarterly frequency and are available in a timely manner, but they can only be used to study the behavior of the household sector as a whole. Micro data from the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) are available every three years and only with a lag, but they can be used to address questions that involve differences in behavior over time and across various types of households. Despite the very different approaches to estimating household net worth, the two data sets show the same general patterns of wealth changes over the past twenty-five years. Areas where the FFA and SCF diverge in aggregate levels—in categories such as owner-occupied housing, non-corporate equity, and credit cards—may be explained by methodological differences in the production of the data. Those differences do not fundamentally alter one’s perception of household wealth dynamics in the period leading up to and following the Great Recession.

Keywords:   Flow of Funds Accounts, Survey of Consumer Finances, household sector, household net worth, aggregate household wealth, Great Recession

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.