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Health and Labor Force Participation over the Life CycleEvidence from the Past$
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Dora L. Costa

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780226116181

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226116198.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 17 October 2019

Internal Migration, Return Migration, and Mortality: Evidence from Panel Data on Union Army Veterans

Internal Migration, Return Migration, and Mortality: Evidence from Panel Data on Union Army Veterans

Chapter:
(p.203) 8 Internal Migration, Return Migration, and Mortality: Evidence from Panel Data on Union Army Veterans
Source:
Health and Labor Force Participation over the Life Cycle
Author(s):
Mario A. Sánchez
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226116198.003.0008

This chapter, which examines internal migration in the United States in the nineteenth century, studies the characteristics of intercounty migrants and estimates the hazard rate of changing county of residence within a year. It investigates whether return migration was common and the characteristics of return migrants, and finally, examines the costs of migration, in terms of mortality. The study uses a large longitudinal data set of residential histories for Union Army veterans, allowing the investigation of not just the migration decision through a richer specification than previous researchers have been able to use, but also the return migration decision, which may be workers' optimal reaction to temporary economic shocks. Longitudinal microdata is also used to study the relationship between migration and life expectancy. Because migration, particularly to urban areas, may have decreased the life expectancy of workers, a “mortality wage premium” may partly account for wage differentials between cities and rural areas.

Keywords:   intercounty migrants, hazard rate, migration costs, workers, life expectancy

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