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The Decision Between UsArt and Ethics in the Time of Scenes$
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John Paul Ricco

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226717777

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226113371.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2019

Introduction

Introduction

Shared-Separation (Decision, Between, Us)

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
The Decision Between Us
Author(s):

John Paul Ricco

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226113371.003.0001

The Introduction provides an overview of the entire book and each of its chapters through a theoretical articulation of the principal terms of the book's title. In the first part, the conceptual valences of the terms “decision,” “between,” and “us” are deconstructed by locating the force and form of shared-separation at the core of each of them. Next, the book's theorization of the inextricable relation between art and ethics is introduced, along with the post-Duchampian concept of the already-unmade (original to this study). In the third and final section, a philosophical genealogy of the notion/phrase “the time of scenes” is traced from an exchange between French philosophers Jean-Luc Nancy and Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe on the “scene,” back to Aristotle's Poetics. Descriptions of the six chapters of the book, and their relations to each other, are also presented in this section of the Introduction. Finally, Maurice Blanchot is given the last word by way of a quotation from his book, The Infinite Conversation, that provides a rather remarkable condensation of the language with which Ricco himself will theorize incommensurable and neutral forms of aesthetic and ethical interruption and separation, as the time and scene of the decision between us.

Keywords:   Shared-Separation, Scene, Jean-Luc Nancy, Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, Maurice Blanchot, Already-Unmade

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