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Politics and PartnershipsThe Role of Voluntary Associations in America's Political Past and Present$
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Elisabeth S. Clemens and Doug Guthrie

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780226109961

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226109985.001.0001

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In the Shadow of the New Deal: Reconfiguring the Roles of Government and Charity, 1928–1940

In the Shadow of the New Deal: Reconfiguring the Roles of Government and Charity, 1928–1940

Chapter:
(p.79) Chapter Four In the Shadow of the New Deal: Reconfiguring the Roles of Government and Charity, 1928–1940
Source:
Politics and Partnerships
Author(s):

Elisabeth S. Clemens

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226109985.003.0004

The encounter of the New Deal with the world of private charity was not one of progressive evolution or succession but rather an intensified contradiction followed by a novel synthesis that would develop into the nonprofit sector of the postwar decades, nurtured both by expanded tax exemptions and multiplying “partnerships” with government. Thus, the limits of the New Deal project of state-building established the foundations for a postwar regime in which a newly named “non-profit sector” would be deeply implicated in governance and individual philanthropy, and in which volunteering would be central to the performance of good citizenship. Although conflicts over the relation of public and private relief persisted, there was a marked convergence between the organizational practices and personnel of private charity and public agencies.

Keywords:   charity, government, New Deal, nonprofit sector, philanthropy, organizational practices

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