Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Victorian Scientific NaturalismCommunity, Identity, Continuity$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Bernard Lightman and Gowan Dawson

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226109503

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226109640.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 24 October 2021

The Fate of Scientific Naturalism: From Public Sphere to Professional Exclusivity

The Fate of Scientific Naturalism: From Public Sphere to Professional Exclusivity

Chapter:
(p.265) 10 The Fate of Scientific Naturalism: From Public Sphere to Professional Exclusivity
Source:
Victorian Scientific Naturalism
Author(s):

Theodore M. Porter

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226109640.003.0011

In his influential reinterpretation of Victorian scientific naturalism, Frank Turner construed it as a tool for advancing the professionalized structure of modern science. We would do better to see it as a broad movement of reform, aiming to reconstruct public culture on the basis of a new ethic of knowledge and inquiry rather than faith. Even the shift away from public science, gaining momentum by the early twentieth century, was no victory of professional exclusivity. Always, science takes shape, not autonomously, but in relation to patrons, clients, and audiences. By the end of the Victorian era, it was adapting to strengthened alliances with state institutions that welcomed a focus on technical ideals of knowledge.

Keywords:   Professionalization, Naturalism, Public science, Statistics, Psychical research, Open science, technicality

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.