Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Roots of RadicalismTradition, the Public Sphere, and Early Nineteenth-Century Social Movements$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Craig Calhoun

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780226090849

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226090870.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

Industrialization and Social Radicalism: British and French Workers’ Movements and the Mid‑Nineteenth‑Century Crises

Industrialization and Social Radicalism: British and French Workers’ Movements and the Mid‑Nineteenth‑Century Crises

Chapter:
(p.197) Chapter Seven Industrialization and Social Radicalism: British and French Workers’ Movements and the Mid‑Nineteenth‑Century Crises
Source:
The Roots of Radicalism
Author(s):

Craig Calhoun

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226090870.003.0008

During the nineteenth century, repeated revolutions in which workers played a major part rocked France. However, these workers failed to capture and hold state power, a “failure” that historians have commonly attributed to France's “backwardness.” Major examples of revolutions in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were observed in countries undergoing economic change, often in the direction of capitalist industrialization—a pattern followed by most later revolutions. This chapter focuses on craft and industrial workers, and on how the former tended to be more radical and the latter more open to ameliorative reform. It argues that many of the comparisons, both implicit and explicit, of nineteenth-century France and Britain have been misleading. The chapter maintains that continuity with preindustrial social organization was important in the struggle to realize a “democratic and social republic” between 1848 and 1851. It also looks at how the history of popular radicalism in Britain is misunderstood.

Keywords:   revolutions, workers, france, industrialization, britain, social organization, radicalism, economic change, social republic

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.