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The Unconverted SelfJews, Indians, and the Identity of Christian Europe$
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Jonathan Boyarin

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780226069197

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226069142.001.0001

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Conclusion: The Christian Dimension

Conclusion: The Christian Dimension

Chapter:
(p.109) Conclusion: The Christian Dimension
Source:
The Unconverted Self
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226069142.003.0007

Christianity did not begin as an identity clearly separated from that of Jews and Judaism. Its history clearly had not yet ended. By the sixteenth century, the Muslims had once again taken Jerusalem. Yet many churchmen believed, with Bernardino de Sahagún, that Christianity was winning from east to west. Sahagún solved the problem of Nahua origins by assimilating the Nahua to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Compared with the presence of unconverted humans — Jews and Muslims — within Christian Europe itself, however, the discovery of unconverted humans in the extreme west was easier to fit into the culmination of the salvific history of time and space.

Keywords:   Christianity, identity, Jews, Judaism, Muslims, Bernardino de Sahagún, Christian Europe, unconverted humans

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