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Mexican Immigration to the United States$
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George J. Borjas

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780226066325

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226066684.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 16 October 2019

Gender and Assimilation among Mexican Americans

Gender and Assimilation among Mexican Americans

Chapter:
(p.57) 2 Gender and Assimilation among Mexican Americans
Source:
Mexican Immigration to the United States
Author(s):
Francine D. Blau, Lawrence M. Kahn
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226066684.003.0003

This chapter examines the assimilation of Mexican immigrants in the U.S. labor market. It studies the relation between gender and assimilation in labor supply and wages, both within and across generations. It shows that there is a much more traditional gender division of labor in the family in Mexico than among Mexican immigrants in the United States, with women in Mexico having considerably lower labor force participation and higher fertility than their ethnic counterparts in the United States. It documents a dramatic rate of assimilation in the labor supply of Mexican immigrant women. After twenty years in the United States, the very large initial differences in female labor supply between Mexican women and other women have been virtually eliminated. Further, the labor supply gap remains small in the second and third generations.

Keywords:   Mexican immigrants, labor market, gender, labor supply, labor force participation, immigrant women

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