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Holding On to RealityThe Nature of Information at the Turn of the Millennium$
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Albert Borgmann

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780226066257

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226066226.001.0001

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Producing Information Writing and Structure

Producing Information Writing and Structure

Chapter:
(p.57) Chapter Six Producing Information Writing and Structure
Source:
Holding On to Reality
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226066226.003.0007

Alphabetic writing depicted that language can be analyzed without remnants into a finite number of definite elements, that is, spoken language into sounds and written language into letters. It suggests that reality is structured all the way down, and at bottom is composed of a small number of meaningless, but well-defined, elements. It is not accurately analyzed whether the analysis of language into sounds and letters in fact inspired Plato and his predecessors to propose an analysis of reality into elements or atoms. The conventional and formal features of language are mere aspects of a natural and contingent phenomenon which is structured at the level of the molecules and neurons language is embodied in, but this fails to exhibit exhaustive lawful structures at higher levels.

Keywords:   alphabetic writing, language, spoken language, written language, Plato

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