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Holding On to RealityThe Nature of Information at the Turn of the Millennium$
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Albert Borgmann

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780226066257

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226066226.001.0001

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Virtuality and Ambiguity

Virtuality and Ambiguity

Chapter:
(p.179) Chapter Fourteen Virtuality and Ambiguity
Source:
Holding On to Reality
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226066226.003.0015

Technological information in any rendition of its basic structure is humanely unrealizable. Semantic resolution of information and human skills of realization are inversely proportional. Technological information is the heart and soul of virtual reality whatever the changes are. The divergence of actual and virtual reality has introduced a new kind of ambiguity into contemporary culture. Virtual reality seems to a burst of fluorescence that dispels the darkness or ordinary life and reveals another more luminous reality. Virtuality can spread a fog of virtual confusion and blur the shape of things and events with glamour and triviality. Eros and thanatos, the erotic life and the solemnity of death, are two of the great forces of the human condition that have particularly suffered glamorization and trivialization.

Keywords:   technological information, basic structure, virtual reality, ambiguity, eros, thanatos

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