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Holding On to RealityThe Nature of Information at the Turn of the Millennium$
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Albert Borgmann

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780226066257

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226066226.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

Realizing Information Playing

Realizing Information Playing

Chapter:
(p.93) Chapter Nine Realizing Information Playing
Source:
Holding On to Reality
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226066226.003.0010

Music highlights the structure of signs instead of the context of things and mainly converts time into events rather than confinement into possibility. Traditional music includes a different way of realizing information. The identity and integrity of a piece of music can be underwritten by a score only if there is a complete and authoritative score. Musical notation is a system of digital signs and therefore has the unsurpassable precision and there is an endless durability of such a system. “Realizing” was a favorite expression among the players, and they felt their activity to be a path from becoming to being, from the possible to the actual. Records submerge the full structure of information more resolutely even than writing and occlude the place, the time, the ardor, and the grandeur that provide the setting for the musical realization of structure.

Keywords:   music, player, structure, signs, writing

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