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Global RivalriesStandards Wars and the Transnational Cotton Trade$
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Amy A. Quark

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226050539

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226050706.001.0001

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Switching Tracks

Switching Tracks

Chapter:
(p.179) Chapter Six Switching Tracks
Source:
Global Rivalries
Author(s):

Amy A. Quark

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226050706.003.0006

Chapter six reveals why conflict-driven processes of institutional change result in new arrangements that are inevitably hybrid. Facing challenges from both rival and marginalized actors, dominant actors are compelled to retool institutional arrangements in an effort to preserve their institutional privileges and stabilize existing rules. This chapter demonstrates how the USDA and transnational merchants launched preservation strategies that aimed to reconstitute the institutional arrangements in ways that would both appease challengers and maintain their institutional privileges. Institutional change thus results in hybrid arrangements as even dominant actors participate in the reconstruction of rules and contribute to a process of track-switching, or the redirecting of these institutions along a new path-dependent trajectory.

Keywords:   Institutional change, Hybrid, Preservation strategy, Track-switching, Path dependency

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