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Androids in the EnlightenmentMechanics, Artisans, and Cultures of the Self$
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Adelheid Voskuhl

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226034027

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226034331.001.0001

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The “Enlightenment Automaton” in the Modern Industrial Age

The “Enlightenment Automaton” in the Modern Industrial Age

Chapter:
(p.201) Six The “Enlightenment Automaton” in the Modern Industrial Age
Source:
Androids in the Enlightenment
Author(s):

Adelheid Voskuhl

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226034331.003.0006

This chapter surveys how the two women automata and the larger set of Enlightenment automata and ideas about them “traveled” from their eighteenth-century origins, through the various phases of industrialization in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and were increasingly used over this period as symbols of industrial modernity overall. The journey through the industrial age demonstrates how widely eighteenth-century automata were used and reveals the conduits through which they remained visible and credible motifs throughout this long time window, to this day. Representative texts from key episodes are used to provide an overview, treating some in greater detail to explain the origins of explicit and implicit assumptions about Enlightenment automata and their role in our imagination of the machine age.

Keywords:   android automata, industrial age, Enlightenment, industrialization, machine age

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