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Bringing in the FutureStrategies for Farsightedness and Sustainability in Developing Countries$
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William Ascher

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780226029160

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226029184.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 06 April 2020

Analytic Exercises

Analytic Exercises

Chapter:
(p.151) Chapter Eight Analytic Exercises
Source:
Bringing in the Future
Author(s):

William Ascher

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226029184.003.0008

This chapter addresses a range of analytic exercises. The entire range of analytic exercises that induce consideration of future consequences can be useful for both prompting concern for the longer-term future and increasing confidence that short-term sacrifices can be converted reliably into long-term gains. The variations of analytic exercises reflect the level at which decisions are to be made: by families, within formal organizations, and among organizations. Technological forecasting is especially important for sustained productivity because selecting a farsighted technology policy depends on understanding the potentials of emerging technologies. The analytic routines will generally be most effective if they are embedded within decision processes of significant stakes. Unless they get something in return, people required to write and enact a strategic plan will be understandably reluctant to engage in a serious planning exercise.

Keywords:   analytic exercises, families, formal organizations, technological forecasting, emerging technologies, planning exercise

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