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Blind to SamenessSexpectations and the Social Construction of Male and Female Bodies$
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Asia Friedman

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226023465

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226023779.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2019

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Blind to Sameness
Author(s):

Asia Friedman

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226023779.003.0001

This introductory chapter first sets out the book's main argument, namely that when we see sex, some parts of the body are noticed, and others are ignored. In fact, the proportion that is relevant for sex attribution is probably smaller than the proportion that is disregarded. This is especially evident when we consider that dominant conceptions of sex are based only, or mostly, on visual data. The chapter also details the study's methodology, interviewing two groups—blind people and transgender people—representing extreme cases in relation to the visual perception of male and female bodies. The aim is to challenge the visual self-evidence of sex differences. An overview of the subsequent chapters is also presented.

Keywords:   social construction, sex attribution, gender, visual perception, male bodies, female bodies, blind people, transgender people

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