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Life AtomicA History of Radioisotopes in Science and Medicine$
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Angela N. H. Creager

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226017808

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226017945.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 28 July 2021

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Chapter:
(p.107) Chapter Four Embargo
Source:
Life Atomic
Author(s):

Angela N. H. Creager

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226017945.003.0004

The fourth chapter explores the ways in which radioisotopes were used as political instruments—both by the federal government in world affairs, and by critics of the civilian control of atomic energy—in the early Cold War. Congress established a civilian agency for atomic energy, with support from scientists, with the expectation that peacetime benefits would materialize. But the controversies the AEC faced in the immediate postwar years, particularly whether to ship radioisotopes to foreign scientists, demonstrate the program’s political vulnerabilities. The core of this chapter analyzes these debates, particularly during the first year of the program, during which time no shipments were sent abroad.

Keywords:   U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), David Lilienthal, Lewis Strauss, Bourke Hickenlooper, Iron-59, Norway, Finland, Anti-communism

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