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Wicked IntelligenceVisual Art and the Science of Experiment in Restoration London$
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Matthew C. Hunter

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226017297

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226017327.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.222) Conclusion
Source:
Wicked Intelligence
Author(s):

Matthew C. Hunter

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226017327.003.0008

Robert Hooke’s death in 1703 and Isaac Newton’s assumption of the Presidency of the Royal Society have often been seen as marking a key shift in scientific practice—a rigorous mathematicization of the physical world and a turn away from the free-flowing experimentalism of the Royal Society’s early years. Once an experimentalist prodigy and favourite of Charles II, Christopher Wren was equally targeted in the first decades of the eighteenth century by critics of his aesthetics and his politics. This conclusion gestures to where and how the fragile project crafted by Hooke, Wren, and their Restoration-era experimentalist colleagues was effectively divided, defeated and defaced in the first quarter of the eighteenth century.

Keywords:   Robert Hooke, Christopher Wren, Isaac Newton, Palladianism, commerce, Nicholas Barbon

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