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Arbitrary RuleSlavery, Tyranny, and the Power of Life and Death$
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Mary Nyquist

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226015538

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226015675.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 27 September 2021

Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.362) Epilogue
Source:
Arbitrary Rule
Author(s):

Mary Nyquist

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226015675.003.0012

This book concludes by presenting two arguably uncontentious conclusions that may be drawn concerning the early modern political theorists and writers selected for this study. First, an individual author's stance on the legitimacy of political resistance has no predictable correlation with the position he adopts on the legitimacy of institutional slavery. Second, for writers concerned with systematization, attitudes toward contemporaneous, transatlantic slavery are thoroughly imbricated with theorization of specific political rights. In the Euro-colonialist arena, antityrannicism's plasticity appears in relations among colonizers, the colonized, and the home government—relations that can be configured variously. Although within European nation-states, antityranny discourse is similarly mobile yet productive in very different ways, antityrannicism's numerous discursive progeny need not eclipse a historical development, glimpses of which have appeared throughout this study.

Keywords:   political theorists, political resistance, institutional slavery, transatlantic slavery, antityrannicism's plasticity

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