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Arbitrary RuleSlavery, Tyranny, and the Power of Life and Death$
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Mary Nyquist

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226015538

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226015675.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 27 September 2021

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.xiv) (p.1) Introduction
Source:
Arbitrary Rule
Author(s):

Mary Nyquist

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226015675.003.0001

This book began as an exploration of the reasons why figurative, political slavery is written about so readily, with such intensity, rhetorical ingenuity, and, occasionally, theoretical rigor, in the English Revolution of the mid-seventeenth century, and again in the American and French Revolutions. The questions raised by this exploration led to others concerning how the Greeks and Romans used the term “slavery” as a figure for political oppression, and to asking how early modern humanists appropriated political “slavery” in addition to the barbarism with which it was often associated. The book addresses the questions posed by the author regarding how political slavery overlaps with personal slavery or its discursive conventions, which were not addressed by scholarship on classical and early modern political philosophy.

Keywords:   political slavery, rhetorical ingenuity, English Revolution, political oppression, barbarism, personal slavery, political philosophy

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