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Five WordsCritical Semantics in the Age of Shakespeare and Cervantes$
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Roland Greene

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226000633

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226000770.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use.date: 20 November 2019

Language

Language

Chapter:
(p.41) Language
Source:
Five Words
Author(s):

Roland Greene

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226000770.003.0003

In 1653, the Jesuit priest António Vieira gave a sermon that spoke of the tongue’s nature as both an organ and a conceit for language itself. Throughout the century, it was possible to think speculatively about the relationship between two concepts, tongue and language, wherein the terms are sometimes synonymous but often alternatives or foils to one another. For Vieira, tongue absorbed all the properties associated with language, as self-conscious, artificial, and potentially human. This chapter takes the relation between tongue and language and reconstructs the conversation or apparent symposium surrounding these terms that spans more than one hundred years and travels across languages and societies. It is through the reconstruction and recall of this virtual conversation that an understanding of Vieira’s attraction to these terms can be achieved.

Keywords:   tongue, language, António Vieira, symposium, virtual conversation

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