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Nature, Norms, and Beasts

Nature, Norms, and Beasts

Chapter:
(p.185) 6 Nature, Norms, and Beasts
Source:
Spinoza and the Politics of Renaturalization
Author(s):
Hasana Sharp
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226750750.003.0007

This chapter goes beyond man and presents the argument that man should not be humiliated. If Spinoza is to be linked to the cause of finding in the beast a more natural idea of man stripped of social distortion, one must be wary of the affects driving the critique of anthropocentrism. The politics of renaturalization must avoid enshrining nature as a new idol. A rejection of humanism does not entail an ennoblement of the cosmos or animal instinct. A posthumanist politics sensitizes us to our permeability and involvement with nonhuman powers, without requiring us to subordinate ourselves to them. A liberating framework for thinking about who and what we are cannot emerge from self-hatred and a desire to repent, by virtue of which we are only “twice wretched.”

Keywords:   man, social distortion, anthropocentrism, renaturalization, humanism, posthumanist politics

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