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The Impersonal Is Political: Spinoza and a Feminist Politics of Imperceptibility

The Impersonal Is Political: Spinoza and a Feminist Politics of Imperceptibility

Chapter:
(p.155) 5 The Impersonal Is Political: Spinoza and a Feminist Politics of Imperceptibility
Source:
Spinoza and the Politics of Renaturalization
Author(s):
Hasana Sharp
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226750750.003.0006

This chapter outlines the problems Elizabeth Grosz identifies with a politics of recognition and examines her exhortation to “imperceptibility” and “impersonality.” It proposes that Grosz’s idiom of force, nature, and impersonality grounds her effort to produce a political vocabulary entirely alien to humanism. Humanism in politics is understood here as one that includes any vision of justice derived from a special feature of existence that is not exhibited by nonhuman beings but is held to be universally shared by humans. Grosz, however, is concerned not with political theory but with feminist, queer, and antiracist thought. She is concerned with movements among the oppressed that constitute alternative ways of life, one not defined by their oppressors.

Keywords:   recognition, Elizabeth Grosz, imperceptibility, impersonality, humanism, justice, antiracist thought

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