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Chimpanzees in US Zoos, Sanctuaries, and Research Facilities: A Survey-Based Comparison of Atypical Behaviors

Chimpanzees in US Zoos, Sanctuaries, and Research Facilities: A Survey-Based Comparison of Atypical Behaviors

Chapter:
(p.481) 21 Chimpanzees in US Zoos, Sanctuaries, and Research Facilities: A Survey-Based Comparison of Atypical Behaviors
Source:
Chimpanzees in Context
Author(s):
Mollie A. BoomsmithAndrea W. ClayStephen R. RossSusan P. LambethCorrine K. LutzSarah D. BreauxRhonda PietschAmy FultzMichael L. LammeySarah L. JacobsonJaine E. Perlman
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226728032.003.0021

The scientific study of chimpanzee welfare has long included the evaluation of atypical or abnormal behavior as one category of well-being measures. This chapter examines the characteristics of chimpanzees performing abnormal behaviors and describes a very large and diverse sample of individuals living in three different captive settings (research facilities, zoos and sanctuaries in the United States). Specifically, this chapter presents the results of a study that used a written survey to characterize the prevalence of seven types of abnormal behaviors in relation to the facility type, early rearing, group size, sex, and age of chimpanzees. The results of this study revealed that the profile of abnormal behavior prevalence varies across the settings in which chimpanzees currently live, and that age, sex, early rearing history and current social group size are also associated with the prevalence of some abnormal behaviors. Furthermore, each type of abnormal behavior correlates with multiple factors, highlighting the complex etiology of chimpanzee abnormal behavior. Truly understanding the welfare of an individual chimpanzee must include assessing the animal’s history and the current circumstances, both of which impact the animal’s present behavior.

Keywords:   animal management, animal welfare, behavioral management, early rearing effects, behavior, great ape, psychological well-being, stereotyped behavior

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