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Three Ways of Describing a Crusader-Poet: Adjacency, Genre-Existence, and Performative Reconfigurations

Three Ways of Describing a Crusader-Poet: Adjacency, Genre-Existence, and Performative Reconfigurations

Chapter:
(p.153) Chapter Five Three Ways of Describing a Crusader-Poet: Adjacency, Genre-Existence, and Performative Reconfigurations
Source:
The Subject of Crusade
Author(s):
Marisa Galvez
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226693491.003.0006

A study of various manuscripts permits us to track the movement of the idiom from lyric phenomenon to material archive. The chapter first illustrates descriptive historical poetics with two objects that embody typical monuments of the crusader and whose meanings seem clear in their respective disciplines of study—a crusader sword in the armored gisant of Jean d'Alluye, and the epitaph on the Frankish stele of Barthélemy Caïn. Understanding the Chinese sword and epitaph as two versions of speaking crusades, we can locate lyrical translations of crusades within and across texts and various possible situations through time and space. The chapter applies this method to manuscripts through modes of adjacency (Thibaut de Champagne, his inquest rolls and chansonnier), genre-existence (Raimbaut de Vaqueiras, his lyric and genres such as the Epic Letter, and their existence in chansonniers), and performative reconfigurations in the Latin East through contrafacture and adaptation of genres (Jehan de Journi's Disme de Penitanche, the lyric of the Templar of Tyre compared to Rutebeuf). The idiom becomes visible through descriptions strategically situated within historical discourses of language, culture, and materiality.

Keywords:   descriptive historical poetics, sword, epitaph, Jean d'Alluye, Templar of Tyre, Raimbaut de Vaqueiras, Jehan de Journi, contrafacture, cartulary rolls, Thibaut de Champagne, Outremer

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