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The Misaki Marine Biological Station’s Dual Roles for Zoology and Fisheries, 1880s–1930s

The Misaki Marine Biological Station’s Dual Roles for Zoology and Fisheries, 1880s–1930s

Chapter:
(p.87) Four The Misaki Marine Biological Station’s Dual Roles for Zoology and Fisheries, 1880s–1930s
Source:
Why Study Biology by the Sea?
Author(s):
Kjell David Ericson
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226673097.003.0005

Marine biological stations have not existed solely inside the academic disciplines of zoology or biology. This chapter takes the case of Japan’s Misaki Marine Biological Station in order to argue that marine biological work was also part and parcel of fisheries work. It traces the convergence and divergence of zoological and fisheries work during Misaki Marine Biological Station’s first half-century, a period spanning from the 1880s to the 1930s. The first section introduces founder Mitsukuri Kakichi’s efforts to institutionalize zoology as a state-supported scientific discipline connected to “applied” fisheries concerns. The second section follows several of Mitsukuri’s zoology protégés who became involved in the formulation of fisheries science as a new discipline. The third section considers how Misaki changed when the discipline of fisheries science joined the zoology program from the early 1910s onward. The fourth section retells the 1920s and ’30s rise of an indoor, physiologically-focused “experimental zoology” at Tokyo Imperial University and its consequences for both zoology and fisheries science. The chapter highlights Misaki’s deep connections to fisheries problems as a constituent part of “applied” zoology and to the multi-stranded field of fisheries science itself.

Keywords:   Zoology, Fisheries, Japan, Misaki

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