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Postnational Aurality: Institutional Detour and the Creolization of Sovereignty

Postnational Aurality: Institutional Detour and the Creolization of Sovereignty

Chapter:
(p.143) Five Postnational Aurality: Institutional Detour and the Creolization of Sovereignty
Source:
Creolized Aurality
Author(s):
Jérôme Camal
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226631806.003.0006

In the new millennium, in the wake of disenchantment with the nationalist project, gwoka's creolized aurality functions as a creative space from which new artistic and political formations can emerge. Musicians–such as the group Soft–dwell in a Creole postnationalist space from which they find new ways to “home” minor transnationalism and to reconcile their positions as both Caribbean and French. This new generation's postnationalist take on gwoka found its political expression in the campaign of activists and musicians who worked together within the Lyannaj pou gwoka (Alliance for Gwoka) to have the drumming tradition recognized as Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. The campaign was controversial, yet successful. UNESCO now recognizes gwoka–once heralded as a symbol of anticolonial struggle–as part of France's cultural heritage and diversity. Beyond its apparent contradiction, the work of the Lyannaj represents another instantiation of the d賯‎ur. By forcing the recognition of Guadeloupe's cultural specificity within the French state on an international stage, the Lyannaj pou gwoka cements the emergence of a Creole postnational citizenship: cognizant of its limited economic autonomy, Guadeloupeans are nonetheless ready to capitalize on their limited cultural sovereignty to redefine–or rather, creolize–their relation with France.

Keywords:   creole postnationalism, detour, cultural sovereignty, postnational citizenship, intangible heritage

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