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Diasporic or Creole Aurality? Aesthetics and Politics across the Abyss

Diasporic or Creole Aurality? Aesthetics and Politics across the Abyss

Chapter:
(p.115) Four Diasporic or Creole Aurality? Aesthetics and Politics across the Abyss
Source:
Creolized Aurality
Author(s):
Jérôme Camal
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226631806.003.0005

By listening to musical encounters spanning the black Atlantic, from Paris to Guadeloupe to New York City, this chapter proposes that jazz and gwoka have–at different times and in different hands–combined to form diasporic auralities through which contested imaginaries are performed, longings and belongings are negotiated and produced, and discrepant Antillean ways-of-being sounded. The musicians in this chapter illustrate the tension between nationalism, on one hand, and Creole and diasporic cosmopolitanisms on the other. The work of G象‎rd Lockel, David Murray and the Gwo Ka Masters, and Jacques Schwarz-Bart suggests different configurations of diasporic refusal, diasporization of creoleness, and creolization of diaspora. Together these performances reveal how the strategic embrace and rejection of diasporicity and creoleness inform Guadeloupean (post)coloniality. Glissant's concepts of “trace” and “opacity” help clarify how “fleeing” and “homing”–read metaphorically as disavowal and embrace–translate into musical aesthetics; or, vice-versa, how the sounds and silences of music reveal complex and open-ended processes of positioning articulated across the abyss of slavery, colonialism, and their aftermaths.

Keywords:   jazz, creolization, diaspora, creoleness, abyss, trace, opacity, Glissant

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