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Pedro de Toledo’s Mostrador e enseñador de los turbados

Pedro de Toledo’s Mostrador e enseñador de los turbados

The Christian Reception of Maimonides’ Guide in Fifteenth-Century Spain

Chapter:
(p.141) 4 Pedro de Toledo’s Mostrador e enseñador de los turbados
Source:
Maimonides' "Guide of the Perplexed" in Translation
Author(s):
Luis M. Girón Negrón
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226627878.003.0005

Early on in Alfonso de la Torre’s La Visión Deleytable, the Intellect personified is escorted by Reason and Truth into the palace of Wisdom. The Intellect is introduced therein to a memorable pageant of ancient and medieval philosophical luminaries. Rambam’s pivotal appearance in this gallery—its only Jewish member—is not ornamental. De la Torre’s encyclopedic fable is steeped in Maimonidean doctrine. Maimonides’ Guide is the primary source of De la Torre’s philosophical curriculum. De la Torre’s venerable classic raises an intriguing question for Iberian intellectual history: how could Maimonides become the main philosophical authority for the primary education of a Christian aristocrat in fifteenth century Spain? What is the historical context that allowed Maimonides’ Guide—the Jewish philosophical classic par excellence—to become a central reference in the intellectual life of Christian Spain in the late Middle Ages?

Keywords:   Spanish, Spain, Translation, Literature

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