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Aeneas Fragment and the Enigma of the End: Georg Forster’s Voyage to the South Pacific and William Hodges’s Views of the Monuments of Easter Island

Aeneas Fragment and the Enigma of the End: Georg Forster’s Voyage to the South Pacific and William Hodges’s Views of the Monuments of Easter Island

Chapter:
(p.180) Nine Aeneas Fragment and the Enigma of the End: Georg Forster’s Voyage to the South Pacific and William Hodges’s Views of the Monuments of Easter Island
Source:
The Conquest of Ruins
Author(s):
Julia Hell
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226588223.003.0010

This chapter explores Georg Forster’s Voyage ‘Round the World and William Hodges’s A View of the Monuments of Easter Island. The author studies the strong imperial intertextuality and intervisuality characterizing Forster’s text and Hodges’s painting. Studying the ruins and inhabitants of the South Pacific with the Aeneid in mind, Forster fashions a neo-Roman space. Relating Hodges’s painting to Piranesi’s prints, the author isolates a similar move in Hodges’s work. The author interprets Forster’s text as an Aeneas fragment. She argues that Virgil’s Aeneid is present in Forster’s travelogue. Forster dons Aeneas’s mantle in his Voyage, even if this gesture, as she argues, is an ambivalent one.

Keywords:   Cook’s Second Voyage, Georg Forster, Virgil, linear time, cyclical time, Aeneas Fragment, William Hodges, imperial intertextuality, imperial intervisuality

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