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The World as Zoo: Acclimatization in the Nineteenth Century

The World as Zoo: Acclimatization in the Nineteenth Century

Chapter:
(p.27) Chapter Two The World as Zoo: Acclimatization in the Nineteenth Century
Source:
The Ark and Beyond
Author(s):
Harriet Ritvo
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226538631.003.0003

Nineteenth-century zoos shared many of the goals of their twentieth-century successors. But in addition to displaying a range of exotic animal species, many of them, including the major metropolitan zoos in London and Paris, also maintained populations of the wild relatives of such domesticates as cattle, sheep, chickens, and turkeys, in the hope of invigorating the local herds and flocks. From the mid-nineteenth-century, most such efforts were carried out by acclimatization societies, which also attempted to introduce exotic wild species and varieties of birds, mammals, and fish that were imagined to be useful or attractive. These initiatives were most effective and transformative in Australia and New Zealand.

Keywords:   acclimatization societies, domesticated animals, hybridity, miscegenation, Zoological Society of London, Jardin d'Acclimatation

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