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The Advent of the Lamb: Unfolding History and Liturgy in Fifteenth-Century Ghent

The Advent of the Lamb: Unfolding History and Liturgy in Fifteenth-Century Ghent

Chapter:
(p.107) Chapter Four The Advent of the Lamb: Unfolding History and Liturgy in Fifteenth-Century Ghent
Source:
The Fullness of Time
Author(s):
Matthew S. Champion
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226514826.003.0005

This chapter traces the uses of time in Philip the Good’s 1458 entry into Ghent following the devastating Ghent war. It uses the accounts of court and urban chroniclers (George Chastelain and the Chronyck van Vlaenderen) to examine the important ways that liturgical temporality and narratives of emotion inflected the entry and its textual representation. Ghent’s troubled relationship with the Duke of Burgundy was dramatized in Philip’s entry procession, where liturgy spilled out of the church and onto the streets. Philip’s role as Christ-like lord of time was played out not only in pageantry that played with biblical and classical pasts, but also in a tableau of the famous Ghent altarpiece of Jan van Eyck. The chapter shows how temporalities shaped by desires for fullness and eternity could be deployed in the pursuit of particularly temporal political agendas.

Keywords:   time, temporality, George Chastelain, liturgy, Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, Ghent, emotion, altarpiece, Jan van Eyck

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