Page of

The Classical Orator as Political Representative: Cicero and the Modern Concept of Representation

The Classical Orator as Political Representative: Cicero and the Modern Concept of Representation

Chapter:
(p.136) Chapter 5 The Classical Orator as Political Representative: Cicero and the Modern Concept of Representation
Source:
Ethics and the Orator
Author(s):
Gary A. Remer
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226439334.003.0007

Contemporary scholars largely agree that political representation is a modern phenomenon. It is argued in this chapter, however, that Cicero envisions his ideal orator-statesman as a representative of the Roman people. First, Cicero uses terms, including procurator, auctor, tutor, dispensator, and vilicus, to describe the ideal orator-statesman, particularly in De oratore and in De republica, in ways that suggest representation. Second, Cicero illustrates characteristics of the orator that are analogous to many of the primary characteristics associated with the modern representative. Cicero’s anticipation of modern representation can be seen by delineating this conception through the writings of theorists of political representation, such as Edmund Burke, the authors of the Federalist Papers, and John Stuart Mill.

Keywords:   Cicero, representation, political representation, orator, Edmund Burke, The Federalist, Publius, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, John Stuart Mill

Sign In

Copyright © 2021. All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy and Legal Notice