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Quintilian and John of Salisbury in the Ciceronian Tradition

Quintilian and John of Salisbury in the Ciceronian Tradition

Chapter:
(p.26) Prologue Quintilian and John of Salisbury in the Ciceronian Tradition
Source:
Ethics and the Orator
Author(s):
Gary A. Remer
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226439334.003.0002

Although the longevity and robustness of the Ciceronian tradition of political morality cannot demonstrated in this single book alone, the Prologue will offer support for the tradition’s endurance and vigor by turning to the thought of Quintilian and John of Salisbury, who were profoundly influenced by Cicero. The Prologue indicates Quintilian's and John of Salisbury's association with the Ciceronian tradition by pointing up their espousal of some of the key elements identified earlier with the tradition. Quintilian and John were intentionally chosen because they lived in late antiquity and the Middle Ages. Cicero’s influence is frequently expected to be weaker (or less genuinely Ciceronian) before the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. These pre-Renaissance Ciceronians suggest that the tradition of Ciceronian political morality also persists from Cicero’s own time through the Renaissance. Quintilian will, perforce, be discussed in greater detail than John of Salisbury, as Cicero’s imprint on him is the more apparent. John’s adoption of elements of Ciceronian political morality, however, will also be adumbrated.

Keywords:   Cicero, Quintilian, John of Salisbury, political morality, rhetoric

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