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Changes in Workplace Segregation in the United States between 1990 and 2000

Changes in Workplace Segregation in the United States between 1990 and 2000

Evidence from Matched Employer-Employee Data

Chapter:
(p.163) 5 Changes in Workplace Segregation in the United States between 1990 and 2000
Source:
The Analysis of Firms and Employees
Author(s):
Judith HellersteinDavid NeumarkMelissa McInerney
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226042893.003.0006

The 1990 Decennial Employer-Employee Dataset (DEED) was developed based on matching records in the 1990 Decennial Census of Population to a Census Bureau list of most business establishments in the United States. It has been used to estimate earnings and productivity differentials in manufacturing by demographic and skill group, to study the influence of language skills on workplace segregation and wages, to document the extent of workplace segregation by race and ethnicity, and to assess the contribution of residential segregation as well as skill to this segregation. A new version, the 2000 Beta-DEED, is based on the 2000 Census of Population. Using the 1990 and 2000 DEEDs, this chapter measures changes in establishment-level workplace segregation over the intervening decade. It studies segregation by education, race and Hispanic ethnicity, and sex. The evidence indicates that ethnic and racial segregation at the workplace level remains quite pervasive.

Keywords:   Decennial Employer-Employee Dataset, United States, racial segregation, race, ethnicity, education, workplace, skill

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