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The River, the Aqueduct, and the Lake

The River, the Aqueduct, and the Lake

Bringing Water to Philadelphia, Boston, and Chicago

Chapter:
(p.10) (p.11) 2 The River, the Aqueduct, and the Lake
Source:
City Water, City Life
Author(s):
Carl Smith
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226022659.003.0002

This chapter discusses the need for a massive water supply in order for any settlement to thrive. Philadelphia was built between the Delaware River and Schuylkill River in the west. Boston was established near Charles River. Chicago was built at the southwestern edge of the Great Lakes. Even with the proximity of the water source, getting water to the city proper was hard. Transporting water can be a costly and burdensome task; a gallon weighs eight pounds, and people need more than a gallon to sustain their daily needs. Because of this, wooden tubes were used to transport water to the city. This chapter explores the ways in which these three cities coped with their water supply as their populations grew bigger.

Keywords:   water supply, water source, Chicago, Philadelphia, city

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