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Perspectives on the Economics of Aging$
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David A. Wise

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780226903057

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226903286.001.0001

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Mortality, Income, and Income Inequality over Time in Britain and the United States

Mortality, Income, and Income Inequality over Time in Britain and the United States

Chapter:
(p.247) 6 Mortality, Income, and Income Inequality over Time in Britain and the United States
Source:
Perspectives on the Economics of Aging
Author(s):

Angus Deaton

Christina Paxson

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226903286.003.0007

This chapter is concerned with the time-series patterns of mortality, income, and income inequality in the United States and Britain. One starting point is Angus Deaton and Christina Paxson, in which pooled time-series and cross-sectional data from the United States are used to estimate a strong protective effect of income across birth cohorts that closely matched estimates from individual-level data from the National Longitudinal Mortality Study. The chapter finds no evidence for the proposition that year and age-specific income inequality is a health hazard; indeed, the regressions show protective effects of higher inequality, essentially because for adults aged thirty-five and over in the United States, mortality declined more rapidly during the period of rapid increase in income inequality in the 1980s than it did in the 1970s, before income inequality began to increase. The chapter extends its analysis to British data, and to a comparative examination of the British and American mortality experiences.

Keywords:   mortality, income, income inequality, United States, Britain, Angus Deaton, Christina Paxson

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