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Music in German PhilosophyAn Introduction$
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Stefan Lorenz Sorgner and Oliver Furbeth

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780226768373

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226768397.001.0001

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Nietzsche

Nietzsche

Chapter:
(p.141) Nietzsche
Source:
Music in German Philosophy
Author(s):

Stefan Lorenz Sorgner

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226768397.003.0007

This chapter evaluates the biography of Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche and elaborates on his particular thoughts on musical philosophy. Nietzsche was born on October 15, 1844 in Röcken. Three phases can be recognized in Nietzsche's philosophy, although it should be noted that the differences are much less momentous than they are sometimes considered to be. For Nietzsche, the given cultural circumstances played a decisive role in addressing the content of the artworks that were developed. The philosophy of music occupied a larger place in Nietzsche's early work. His theories of opera and of the music dramas of the future were based on his attitude toward life. The most direct relationship of Nietzsche's philosophy of music to a music philosophy of the twentieth century occurred with Martin Heidegger. His philosophy of music affected how classical philologists have understood tragedy.

Keywords:   Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche, musical philosophy, philosophy of music, opera, music dramas, Martin Heidegger, tragedy, classical philologists

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