Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Paleobiological Revolution
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

The Paleobiological Revolution: Essays on the Growth of Modern Paleontology

David Sepkoski and Michael Ruse

Abstract

Paleontology has long had a troubled relationship with evolutionary biology. Suffering from a reputation as a second-tier science and conjuring images of fossil collectors and amateurs who dig up bones, it was marginalized even by Darwin himself, who worried that incompleteness in the fossil record would be used against his theory of evolution. But with the establishment of the modern synthesis in the 1940s and the pioneering work of George Gaylord Simpson, Ernst Mayr, and Theodosius Dobzhansky, as well as the subsequent efforts of Stephen Jay Gould, David Raup, and James Valentine, paleontolo ... More

Keywords: paleontology, evolutionary biology, Darwin, fossil record, theory of evolution, George Gaylord Simpson, Ernst Mayr, Theodosius Dobzhansky, Stephen Jay Gould, David Raup

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2009 Print ISBN-13: 9780226748610
Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013 DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226748597.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

David Sepkoski, editor

Michael Ruse, editor

Show Summary Details

subscribe or login to access all content.

Contents

View:

Introduction: Paleontology at the High Table

David Sepkoski and Michael Ruse

I Major Innovations in Paleobiology

II The Historical and Conceptual Significance of Recent Paleontology

III Reflections on Recent Paleobiology

Chapter Twenty-Four An Interview with David M. Raup

Edited by David Sepkoski and David M. Raup

End Matter