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Why Not Parties?Party Effects in the United States Senate$
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Nathan W. Monroe, Jason M. Roberts, and David W. Rohde

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780226534879

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226534947.001.0001

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Distributive and Partisan Politics in the U.S. Senate: An Exploration of Earmarks

Distributive and Partisan Politics in the U.S. Senate: An Exploration of Earmarks

Chapter:
(p.229) 12 Distributive and Partisan Politics in the U.S. Senate: An Exploration of Earmarks
Source:
Why Not Parties?
Author(s):

Michael H. Crespin

Charles J. Finocchiaro

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226534947.003.0012

This chapter examines whether and to what degree the distribution of pork-barrel project dollars across states is biased toward the majority party. It begins with a review of the literature on distributive and partisan theories before turning to more recent efforts at explaining congressional earmarks. It then describes the data and methods employed in the analysis, and presents descriptive and then multiple regression results accounting for the role of parties, institutional status, and other factors in the allocation of pork. It is shown that the majority party does maintain an advantage when it comes to earmark dollars, though the advantage is not present on all of the appropriations bills.

Keywords:   pork barrel projects, funding, majority party, congressional earmarks

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