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Truth MachineThe Contentious History of DNA Fingerprinting$
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Michael Lynch, Simon A. Cole, and Ruth McNally

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780226498065

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226498089.001.0001

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Finality?

Finality?

Chapter:
(p.335) Chapter Ten Finality?
Source:
Truth Machine
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226498089.003.0015

This chapter, which discusses some implications of the exceptional and extraordinary power now granted to DNA profiling, suggests that the transition of DNA profiling from fallibility to irrefutability was bridged by the use of probability figures to estimate the probative value of DNA evidence. The analysis of challenges to DNA probability figures showed that the information value of DNA evidence and the probability estimates associated with such evidence continue to be based on judgments in fields of possibility. DNA profiling has also been used to support and even promote the use of the death penalty, and it also enhances the state's ability to monitor and control the detailed conduct of individuals.

Keywords:   DNA profiling, probative value, DNA evidence, probability estimates, death penalty, evidence, possibility

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