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HierarchyPerspectives for Ecological Complexity$
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T. F. H. Allen and Thomas B. Starr

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226489544

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226489711.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use (for details see www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 09 December 2018

Scaling Strategies

Scaling Strategies

Chapter:
(p.197) Chapter Eight Scaling Strategies
Source:
Hierarchy
Author(s):

T.F.H. Allen

Thomas B. Starr

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226489711.003.0009

Life and society use scaling strategies to avoid spread of disturbance with scaling that creates gaps and obstructions. Cannibalism turns offspring into food as necessary. Disease adjusts its virulence up or down to deal with changing degrees of connections between hosts. Invasion of alien species is facilitated if there is a human haven from which they can escape, as in rabbits in Australia. Endosymbiosis is a way of making biological hierarchies deeper, more robust, and resilient. It occurs in business as takeovers and franchises. Rescaling can adapt to resource availability making for a more robust scheme.

Keywords:   cannibalism, cultivers, disease, endsymbiosis, invasive species, perturbation, resilience, resource capture, scale, strategies

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