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Chicago MadeFactory Networks in the Industrial Metropolis$
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Robert Lewis

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780226477015

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226477046.001.0001

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Chicago, the Mighty City

Chicago, the Mighty City

Chapter:
(p.21) Chapter 1 Chicago, the Mighty City
Source:
Chicago Made
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226477046.003.0002

Chicago shot to industrial preeminence almost overnight, becoming America's second largest industrial metropolis by 1900. While it never matched New York, the city's industrial growth was nevertheless breathtaking in its extent and speed. In a very short time, an extremely large and diverse industrial base—as measured by the number of firms and employees, the amount of capital investment and industrial output, and the range of industries and productive strategies—was created on the shores of Lake Michigan. As the promoters of one industrial development intoned, “Chicago, the mighty city which the fates have determined shall be the London and the Manchester of America rolled into one.” Chicago, America's Manchester, exemplified the transformation of a small mid-nineteenth-century city into a large twentieth-century industrial metropolis by the process of geographical industrialization. This chapter discusses manufacturing industries in Chicago; the link between industrial development and metropolitan growth; and the residential geography of the metropolis.

Keywords:   metropolis, industrialization, industrial development, residential geography

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