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Starring Mandela and CosbyMedia and the End(s) of Apartheid$
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Ron Krabill

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780226451886

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226451909.001.0001

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“They Stayed 'til the Flag Streamed”

“They Stayed 'til the Flag Streamed”

Chapter:
(p.53) Chapter Three “They Stayed 'til the Flag Streamed”
Source:
Starring Mandela and Cosby
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226451909.003.0004

This chapter examines television's introduction to South Africa in 1976. In spite of the political contention around television before it arrived, the medium quickly became a popular and important part of the mediascape of South Africa. From the very beginning, television remained under the strict control of the ruling party and its allies. Nonetheless, White South Africans began to form a new communicative space through television and, most important, shared that space with the world beyond South Africa through transnational media flows. And even though the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) initially excluded Black South Africans from both television and its conceptualization of its own audiences, Black South Africans also began to participate in this newly forming communicative space of television. Thus, television's initial presence in the context of South Africa immediately began complicating the tightly controlled mediascape of apartheid, with transnational media flows crossing both national and racial borders.

Keywords:   television, South Africa, mediascape, White South Africans, Black South Africans, South African Broadcasting Corporation, apartheid, transnational media flows

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