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Ethics and the OratorThe Ciceronian Tradition of Political Morality$
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Gary A. Remer

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226439167

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226439334.001.0001

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Rhetoric as a Balancing of Ends: Cicero and Machiavelli

Rhetoric as a Balancing of Ends: Cicero and Machiavelli

Chapter:
(p.89) Chapter 3 Rhetoric as a Balancing of Ends: Cicero and Machiavelli
Source:
Ethics and the Orator
Author(s):

Gary A. Remer

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226439334.003.0005

Despite their similarities, Cicero and Machiavelli differ from each other in that Cicero, in contrast to Machiavelli, openly affirms that politics is incomplete without a dual commitment to the good (honestum) and the beneficial (utile). This chapter examines Machiavelli’s focus on the useful and public as opposed to Cicero’s additional commitment to the honorable and to the private. It contrasts the pursuit of glory in Machiavelli, which was preoccupied with appearances and the search for immortality, with Cicero's ambivalent attitude toward glory. This chapter also discusses Cicero's "decorum," which is not only a matter of expediency but also a moral duty.

Keywords:   Cicero, Niccolò Machiavelli, decorum, honestum, utile, glory, Victoria Kahn

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