Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Make It RainState Control of the Atmosphere in Twentieth-Century America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kristine C. Harper

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226437231

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226437378.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use (for details see http://www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 November 2017

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Make It Rain
Author(s):

Kristine C. Harper

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226437378.003.0001

The introduction presents an overview of weather control’s history in the United States since the nineteenth century, in particular how and why it made the transition from local area rainmaking to large-scale weather control as a tool of the American state, which used it for both domestic and foreign policy purposes. It provides a primer on the concept of the state, examining the many ways that the state has been defined, and adopts Margot Canaday’s definition of the state as “what officials do.” It discusses the connection between science, technology, and the American state, and how weather control ultimately came to exert political agency in the twentieth century.

Keywords:   weather control, the state, science, technology, domestic policy, foreign policy, political agency

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.