Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Science, Conservation, and National Parks$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Steven R. Beissinger, David D. Ackerly, Holly Doremus, and Gary E. Machlis

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226422954

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226423142.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use (for details see www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 November 2018

A New Kind of Eden

A New Kind of Eden

Chapter:
(p.328) (p.329) Sixteen A New Kind of Eden
Source:
Science, Conservation, and National Parks
Author(s):

Jamais A. Cascio

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226423142.003.0016

What would a sustainable future look like? This chapter explores three 50-year scenarios of how we may develop a globally sustainable society and what each might foretell for national parks. Professional foresight, or “futurism,” surveys the dynamics of change across disciplines in order to construct scenarios of future changes to society. Foresight scenarios are not intended to be predictions, but examinations of different ways in which current trends and likely future developments may co-evolve. Such scenarios can illuminate options and highlight unexpected challenges for decision-makers. In this endeavor, scenarios of success can be as useful as scenarios of risk. The narratives in this chapter consider a future for national parks in three scenarios; each attempts to illustrate how we might succeed in overcoming the global sustainability crisis, in direct response to the dominance of apocalyptic narratives in popular discussions of sustainability. The first describes a future in which sustainability emerges from increased control over the economy by global institutions. The second describes a future in which, subsequent to a global climate disaster, civil society creates new institutions through open-source and collaborative tools. The third describes a future in which radical technological developments allow for unprecedented social, economic, and environmental transformation.

Keywords:   emerging technologies, foresight scenarios, future, national parks, predictions, sustainability

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.